The Truth About Contracts, Parse Syntax, and Us

Tuesday, April 4, 2017

The Truth About Contracts, Parse Syntax, and Us


By Anna Von Reitz

I don’t believe that people or their institutions have any ability to contract.  It’s simply not within our temporal nature and skill set. We can’t guarantee that we will live another minute.  We can’t know what time it is in any absolute sense.  We can’t even describe where we are, physically, without arbitrary references.

For mortals who don’t know where they are and don’t know what time it is to make contracts obligating themselves to do things in the future—-is obvious madness.  We are incompetent and fundamentally unable to do any such thing, so all contracts are void ab initio, for intrinsic fraud.
We are like mice trying to dictate the life cycle of horses.  Making contracts is simply not something we can do, so we ought to stop pretending otherwise.

Once we acknowledge the facts of our limited nature and circumstance we are prepared to deal with things — including ourselves — as we really are.

If we accept our natural limitations and humbly agree to the best of our ability on a course of action, that is not a contract.  That is a Good Faith Agreement.
If we further make the effort to express that agreement in a way that is mathematically sound and unequivocal, using Parse Syntax, it in no way confers any supernatural power to keep the agreement; rather, Parse Syntax makes sure that the agreement says exactly what it says, no more and no less, and cuts out confusion and arguments–which is surely something much to be desired.
For myself I prefer a simple honor code in which we let our yes be yes and our no be no, as the Bible says, and to the extent possible, let our word be our bond— accepting always that “time and unforeseen circumstance” may derail our most earnest efforts and intentions and forgiving each other when that happens.
The concept of “Good Faith” is not difficult, but it is not possible to maintain when we pretend and tell lies about ourselves and our limited abilities.  Nor is Good Faith something we can maintain without sincere effort and clear communications.  It is in this last capacity that Parse Syntax can serve humanity in noble purpose: put an end to the use of slippery, slithery, descriptive language when making business agreements.
Parse Syntax, properly and honestly defined, is an “iron rod”.  If not an absolute safeguard against misunderstanding, it is as close as we are likely to come until the day that we can communicate telepathically and record the sum total of all thoughts, intentions, and feelings associated with an agreement.
Most of my days I spend immersed in sorting out confusions that are the result of both honest and dishonest actions. People regularly come away from the same conversation with different assumptions and they take different actions accordingly. This causes no end of confusion and discord, even when it is done innocently and for no dishonest purpose.  Imagine how crazy it gets when people purposefully seek to confuse things and defraud others?
Parse Syntax can help people deal more clearly and honestly with each other.  That isn’t always what people want to do, but Parse Syntax can go a long way toward ensuring that result.
I would guess that if Parse Syntax were used to express Good Faith Agreements, 99% of the expense and misery associated with today’s commercial court system could simply go away.
And wouldn’t that be a blessing?

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